Talbot County, Maryland
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Elevation Certificates for Homeowners

An Elevation Certificate is an important tool that documents your building’s elevation. If you live in a high-risk flood zone, you should provide an Elevation Certificate to your insurance agent to obtain flood insurance and ensure that your premium accurately reflects your risk. Obtaining an Elevation Certificate also can help you make decisions about rebuilding and mitigation after a disaster.

Comparing Your Building’s Elevation to a Potential Flood Level
Your insurance agent will use the Elevation Certificate to compare your building’s elevation to the Base Flood Elevation (BFE).

The base flood is a flood with a 1 percent chance of occurring in any given year. The BFE identifies how high the water is likely to rise in a base flood. The land area of the base flood is called the Special Flood Hazard Area, floodplain, or high-risk zone.

Flood insurance rates in a high-risk zone are based on a building’s elevation above, at, or below the BFE.

Finding Your Building’s Elevation
Talbot County keeps elevation information on file in the Permits Department and may have information on your building or others nearby.

To check the availability of a recent elevation certificate:

Click on this link to open a map of Elevation Certificates.
 
Zoom in on the area of your property,Click on the symbol closest to your location to discover if there are several elevation certificates on your street.
 
A printable Elevation Certificate will pop up. Check the address and if it is the correct certificate, print a copy for your records.
 
You may need to try more than one certificate if there are several in your vicinity.
 

If no elevation information is available, you might need to hire a State-licensed surveyor, architect, or engineer to complete an Elevation Certificate. Depending on your location and the complexity of the job, the cost of a surveyor can vary.

 

Page last modified 12/06/17 15:56:23

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